Posts Tagged Rebirth

Suicide Squad #1 Review: One Step Away From Greatness

Suicide Squad #1 builds upon the same idea that the past books have and quickly establishes the premise of Amanda Waller gathering various super villains to fight as a team on black ops missions nobody else will know about. With the recent release of the new movie, Suicide Squad is a popular topic and probably one DC wants to push in their new Rebirth series. While the individual members of the Suicide Squad are lovable, the story and idea feels overworked at this point. The book, which is only one issue in, needs to quickly get past the introductory portion and move into the team going on cool adventures.

Rob Williams hasn’t done anything bad so far from a writing standpoint, but it would be really nice to see him break things open and send readers on a wild ride with this team. Suicide Squad has the opportunity to be a great book, but it needs to get readers attached to the characters and put them in moral grey areas that leave people questioning whether to support the individual character they like or the team and what is morally best for the situation. Villains as heroes is a really fun topic to explore, but if they can set it up to make these villains likable, then it should become a complex and fun book.

The art so far has felt pretty standard, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. The legendary Jim Lee is working with Scott Williams on this book, and Lee’s style is so traditional to comics that you can never not enjoy it. There are definitely some more unique artists around, but Jim Lee really set the bar for comic book art and he continues to bring great style, technique and detail to his work. There were tons of great scenes in this book and each panel has so much detail to it that the pages feel very thorough. For Suicide Squad there is always a lot going on because there are the individuals as well as the team aspect which set up for Lee and Williams to deliver some beautifully drawn scenes.

Verdict

Suicide Squad #1 hopefully gets all of the set up and origin out of the way for the most part, because the majority of readers are already familiar with that information. Once this book finds its footing and is given the ability to focus on the missions, it should be a ton of fun to read.

Rating3/5 

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DC Rebirth Review: The DC We All Know and Love is Back!

DC Rebirth Review: The DC We All Know and Love is Back!

Five years ago DC Comics decided that they thought it would be a good time to finally reboot their entire universe and start fresh for the new generations of comic readers. We all know how the story goes at this point; Flashpoint happens, it reboots the universe, the New 52 begins. Now, there was a bunch of good and bad within the New 52, and it was a brave and bold move by DC to decide to wipe away decades of history and start anew, but in the long-term things just didn’t hold up. It has only been five years since the inception of the New 52, so when Rebirth was announced, it rightfully freaked everyone out. Was this another universe reboot? Had DC acknowledged their mistakes but decided to scrap the new universe? It was an interesting announcement, but, in Geoff Johns we trust.

Despite not being a DC Comics expert and trying to catch up with A LOT, I absolutely loved this book. I have enough knowledge to know the deal with Wally, and he was the perfect story to focus on because of the emotional wrapped up in his character. For me, seeing Wally try to find his way back to reality by having a single person remember him was really sad, and I wasn’t sure if he would make it back. When he decides to visit Barry, when Wally thinks all hope is lost, I was pretty sad and thought that it might actually be the end; yet, when Barry remembers and they both begin to break down from the flood of memories that come rushing back, it hits you in the feels really hard.

The use of Wally trying to get back is also a great way to re-introduce us to what all of the characters are up to. Something that the story does really well is transition us into this new era of storytelling for DC by acknowledging the changes of the New 52 and that we can expect changes going forward. Wally talks about how Green Arrow and Black Canary are meant to be but currently don’t even know each other, he watches with familiarity as Aquaman proposes to Mera, and it’s things like this that help blend the past and the present of DC Comics for the readers.

Throughout the story, Wally keeps discussing the idea that it wasn’t actually Flashpoint that launched the New 52 and changed things, but an outside force who was attacking them. In the end, we learn that it was the Watchmen, or, at least, Dr. Manhattan. It’s a really interesting concept to move forward with and something that I’m excited to read through. This story positions the Watchmen as enemies and that should be a really fun confrontation.

Overall, DC Rebirth was an amazing comic. People keep commenting on the fact that it was the best DC Comic to be released in the past 10-15 years, which I can’t claim, but I can at least believe. The story presented carried a ton of emotional weight and is an extremely unique idea that feels like it’s going to work. Geoff Johns knows what he is doing and shows us that time and time again. I’ve only recently started getting back into DC comics on a hardcore level; I know I have a lot to catch up with, but I can already see the difference between some New 52 stories and Rebirth. What it comes down to is Rebirth had he emotion and heart that goes missing in the New 52. I probably won’t be caught up or following the Rebirth titles right away, but I can’t wait until I get there.

 

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